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Offline J.C

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Going Cuba
« on: November 07, 2015, 12:41:46 PM »
Some of you may be aware of the Cyber Wars that are going on. Some of you may be more intelligent than all of the Snowden Fans out there to know there is a world with more than one globe where the sunny sun shines on at. well I don´t care if you are a fanboy or a fangirl. it is up to you what to believe. But those that know more about the work of the spooks, spies and all that stuff you know. may want to look at this little chronology I put together. You should know that many stuff in the IC-world belongs to conspiracy´s and off course your not always on the path of "truth" (if something like that exists, I hardly doubt that ;-) ) so I take you on a travel to Cuba. 

Yes. pretty cool cars.

I start with a Blog post of Robert Morton (hope he doesn't mind his work is posted here)
(Robert Morton, Ed., Ed.S. is a member of the Association Of Former Intelligence Officers (AFIO) and writes the online spy novel series "Corey Pearson- CIA Spymaster in the Caribbean". The views expressed on this site do not represent those of any organization he is a member of. Contact him on the Secure Contact Form)

LET'S OUTSOURCE DOMESTIC SPYING TO CHINA!

The Edward Snowden affair makes me think back to 9/11. Shortly after witnessing the horrors of that day, I was upset when a domestic surveillance program was ruled unconstitutional by a federal judge. At the time, I posed reasons why Beijing should pick up the slack. Yes... Beijing...as in China. Let me caution you...when I'm upset I often resort to humor.

The first reason we should pay China to spy on America is that our Asian "friend" already has the opportunity to do so... in Cuba! Yes, China operates a super-secret complex that eavesdrops on our satellite-based military transmissions, the messages contained in our home and business faxes and e-mails...even our cell phone transmissions (I shudder when I think that the Chinese may know what pizza toppings l like, for I order a home-delivered special every Friday on my cell phone).

CIA agents in Cuba grew suspicious when large numbers of names like Yang Chow and Yo-Yo Qian booked into hotels in Havana in the late 1990's. Sure enough, shortly thereafter a Chinese electronic espionage facility sprang up. In return, Beijing gave Castro electronic countermeasures to block Radio Marti from carrying pro-U.S.
Radio~Miami and TV broadcasts into Cuba from Miami.

During the post-9/11 period, I was upset when an ACLU lawsuit handcuffed America's intelligence services in their attempts to ferret out die hard radical Islamic sleeper cells lurking inside America. I remember visualizing people jumping off the tops of the Twin Towers, wondering what they were feeling as they flew toward the pavement far below. The National Security Agency's (NSA) interception of billions of e-mail, fax, cell phone, I-Pod...whatever airborne messages... seemed like a personal security blanket that kept Americans out of harm's way and guaranteed their future liberty.

Fortunately, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit concluded that, because none of those in the ACLU suit could prove they had been monitored, they had no standing to bring the suit. I'd wager practically all of the loved ones of the 9/11 victims sided with that court decision!

But, a growing number of Americans feel the opposite today, even though the information NSA collects is too vast to record and personally read by a human being. So, they created a Dictionary Program . It whizzes through the Library of Congress-sized data and zeros in on several dozen threat targets out of billions (trillions?) of intercepts. Then, and only then, a real live human may read the targeted intercepts and eliminate spy thriller writers like me who tap into the keyboard fictional, terrorist plots to attack America or publish articles similar to the one you are now reading.

I do not see how robust monitoring of targeted American communications to overseas points violates our personal freedoms; there's simply too much information collected. Also, when the NSA monitoring programs narrow down potential threats to a select few, the FISA requirements kick into gear. The Bush administration wanted to make the Protect America Act a permanent fixture in our surveillance arsenal. With the FISA requirement, our intelligence services could monitor (with warrants) the communications of foreign or domestic home-grown suspects.

Personally, I feel safer being inconvenienced by having to take off my shoes, unbuckle my belt from around a bulging waistline, empty my pockets of coins and car keys and taking my laptop computer out of its carrying case before boarding a commercial airliner with 350 strangers and ascending to 35,000 feet at 530mph. Likewise, I feel safer when
suspicious e-mails and international cell phone calls are screened in the airways that I share with billions of other cyberspace strangers. If the NSA targets what pizza toppings I like on my Friday night cell phone take-home pizza orders...fine!

If I may return to the ridiculous suggestion that America outsource its domestic spying to China. It would eliminate the problem of leakers of classified information and the few unscrupulous whistleblowers (I admire most whistleblowers) who place us in harm's way. When I think of 5 million Americans holding top secret clearances and hundreds of thousands of them being private contractors, my mind shouts out "Holy Edward Snowden!" and imagines an endless supply of leakers bent on becoming selfless martys of public adulation pursuing personal glory and fame...then high-tailing it to Hong Kong.

Trouble is, most of the top-secret NSA info he gave to Russia and China did not involve civil liberty issues. The fact that Russia and China learned from Snowden which of their computer networks and systems the NSA hacked into and were monitoring does not safeguard the civil liberties and freedoms of Americans...it blinds them from overseas threats.

So, why not make China's Ministry of State Security (MSS)- not NSA, FBI or CIA- the target for this misdirected human energy? Why not outsource the job to Chinese spies who operate only a stone's throw away...in Cuba? Since they already eavesdrop on America's heartland, they're bound to stumble upon a homegrown terrorist cell in Lackawana, NY or some other American city when they dial their cohorts in the middle east to fine-tune their attack plans. We could shell out $50 million for each cell they hand over to us...equal to the bounty we offered for bin Laden's head.

Holy Sen. Frank Church committee...the move may even appease the ACLU! After all, farming out the domestic spying job to communist China would preserve our free speech, privacy, and the separation of powers enshrined in the Constitution. Beijing faces no legal or moral catch-22's when it comes to eavesdropping; for years they've snooped on their 1.8 billion citizens and suppressed internal protests for democracy. Paying off a despotic regime to eavesdrop on Americans would permit Uncle Sam to continue along his self-governing, anti-racial profiling, no mentioning of "radicalized Islam", and anti-warrantless snooping pathway to democratic preservation.

My Chinese outsourcing idea would also soothe the anxieties felt by our counterintelligence agencies, who feel they're not doing enough to uncover the radicalized homegrown sleeper cells lurking amongst us. Not too long ago, ex-FBI Director Robert S. Mueller lamented to Congress about these domestic counterintelligence shortfalls. My China option would alleviate Mueller's concerns, especially if Beijing's spies in Cuba begin handing the FBI some names.

So, let's entice their cloak-and-dagger operation near Bejucal, a small town south of Havana, to reprogram their orbiting satellites and ground based, state-of-the art signals intelligence hardware. Like a vacuum sweeping up dust particles off a carpet, they already suck up satellite-based U.S. military communications, along with our personal business and computer e-mails, cell phone calls, telex, fax messages and, perhaps, the pizza-delivery toppings I order over my cell phone. So, what's the big deal about letting them inspect messages sent out from the U.S. to Jihad-friendly countries?

Besides, Beijing owes us one! U.S. counterintelligence believes many of the 97,000 Chinese permitted to visit the U.S. each year must agree to specific technology collection requirements set by Beijing. The FBI's 15,000+ agents are spread paper thin shadowing Chinese diplomatic and business officials, students, delegation envoys and émigrés. They've busted dozens of our Asian friends who fan out across America seeking to buy U.S. military technology, such as the AGM-129 cruise missile. Ko-Suen "Bill" Moo, one of the most significant Chinese arms dealers ever arrested, attempted to purchase from undercover agents the AGM-129 cruise missile, which has stealth technology and can carry nuclear warheads 2,300 miles.

"The fact that this individual was plotting to purchase advanced U.S. cruise missiles for a foreign government is truly alarming," ICE chief Julie Myers said. "This case demonstrates, in the clearest terms possible, the need to protect sensitive U.S. technology from illegal foreign acquisition." Incidentally, the once super-secret and advanced AGM-129 is positioned under the wingspan of our B-52 fleet.

The FBI is spread paper thin in its attempts to uncover jihadist sleeper cells lurking among us, who believe martyrdom and certainty of paradise can be reached by detonating "dirty" radioactive bombs, biological weapons... or worse... inside America. This is why we can't afford to have the Edward Snowden's of the espionage world releasing classified information as they see fit. In today's hi-tech world, America needs to protect itself. The symbol of our strength and security is the majestic Bald Eagle, but the shaft of our enemy's arrow is feathered with one of the eagle's own plumes; we are giving our enemies the means for our own destruction.

The need for the NSA to conduct broad domestic and foreign surveillance and for FISA-approved wiretapping on narrowed-down, specific threat targets is needed. When the NSA screens trillions of electronic airway communications it is not invading anyone's personal privacy or liberty, for each individual remains anonymous.

My outrageous Chinese outsourcing proposal underscores how legally and morally handcuffed the Intelligence Community (IC) is. They need more help, but not from China. Even though we're searching for a balance between our personal freedoms and security, I hope the courts continue to uphold the broad domestic warrantless surveillance program. I don't care if Uncle Sam knows what toppings I order on my home delivered pizza...Beijing already does.

Linkback: http://www.wikileaks-forum.com/edward-snowden/469/going-cuba/34544/
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Offline J.C

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Re: Going Cuba
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2015, 12:46:05 PM »
So what this all have to do with Cuba? Why did the USG opened a new Motherbase in Cuba and who else is going there. Rise your flags and take a beer we drive a pretty car - choose yours.



The Chinese in Cuba & the Cyber War (dated May 2006)

Someone is Listening



The Peoples Liberation Army of Communist China is listening to American telecommunications transmissions - phone, satellite, and other methods - for the base it controls in Cuba. Even more alarming, the Chinese listening post is only one part of a larger asymmetrical, cyber war now being waged against the United States, according to a well-informed source.



The spy base in Bejucal, Cuba, installed by Communist China to listen to American telecommunications
The attacks of September 11, 2001 signaled the beginning of a long-planned guerrilla war against America, with the object of bringing the U.S. "to its knees," according to Dr. Manuel Cereijo, an expert in electronic warfare, in a recently published article in the predominately Spanish language site, La Nueva Cuba.

China's spy base in Bejucal, Cuba was constructed between 1994 and 1997. The sophisticated listening post was built by the "new" Russia of Boris Yeltsin at a cost of some $800 million. During the construction of the state-of-the-art signals intelligence post, Yeltsin proclaimed his unswerving commitment to democracy and the free market, and his friendship with the United States.

Cuba is doing more than simply playing host to Russian construction workers, or Chinese military personnel. Despite the media image of Cuba as either a decaying communist regime or a great tourist destination, Havana devotes millions of dollars to its world-class espionage service and the operation of a large and highly sophisticated cyber warfare training school.

The events of September 11 were only the first blows in a guerrilla war against the United States, Cereijo asserts. Cuba has already staged a limited cyber attack against the U.S. in 2003, and continues to work closely with Iranian scientists to bring "America to its knees," Cereijo states.

Cuba not only embraces the Islamic Republic of Iran, but the United States government has also recently declared that Cuba enjoys close ties with international terror groups.

Several groups using radiological, nuclear, biological, or chemical weapons in concert with a major cyber attack would probably start the next major assault against the U.S., Cereijo speculates.

The Cuban dictatorship has lost none of its hatred of the U.S., nor of its political and economic system. Havana's communist dictatorship has spawned two closely connected offspring, one in Venezuela, one in Bolivia. Called "leftist" by the media, Hugo Chavez of Venezuela and Evo Morales of Bolivia share Cuban dictator Fidel Castro's dream of a continent-wide communist empire - and the destruction of the United States.

The U.S. public is justifiably concerned over the government's delay and disorganization in controlling the nation's borders. The public should be outraged over the lack of information and analysis concerning threats to the U.S. coming from countries south of our borders. We must control entry into our nation, or we will soon find that we are in a life and death struggle within our own country.
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Offline J.C

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Re: Going Cuba
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2015, 12:49:01 PM »
People's Liberation Army's 'Leap Forward'; China Boosts Techno-Spy Base In Cuba (dated 2008)

July 26: The Chinese military has achieved a qualitative "leap forward" with emphasis on "effectiveness and technology," reports the People's Liberation Army publication Outlook. The PLA has also prepared for high-technology warfare and rapid deployment of its force. According to the magazine, the army, air force and navy have developed "comprehensive equipment systems" to fight in all types of warfare. In addition, the PLA has developed a comprehensive system of long, medium and short range missiles, and is capable of launching nuclear missiles from submarines, from ships, or from land-based mobile missiles.

The PLA's submarines are capable of high-speed cruising, Outlook continues, and are capable of launching nuclear missiles in "very deep" water. In addition, dozens of models of tactical missiles have reached "internationally advanced levels." The PLA has developed the Galaxy military computer, capable of 10 billion calculations per second, making China one of the few countries capable of independently designing and constructing high speed computers.

The South China Morning Post reports that in Guangzhou province, facing Taiwan, the PLA has deployed China's first comprehensive automatic war zone command system. The system combines the functions of command, control, surveillance, communications and electronic warfare, as well as tightened liaison among regional forces. The PLA can now prepare a battle or logistical plan in a few minutes, instead of hours, as it took in the past.

July 28: The PLA air force has performed a record amount of flight training time, the China Evening News reports, and recently tested a surface-to-air missile [SAM] with 100 percent accuracy. The flight record was set during the first half of this year, including difficult drills at night, at low altitude and in heavy weather. The PLA also tested a new SAM under near-battlefield condition, hitting its target every time.

July 30: China has begun filling the gap in Cuba -- economically, politically and militarily -- that was created by the collapse of the Soviet Union, writes James Suchlicki in the Wall Street Journal.

"Evidence is mounting that China's main interest in Cuba is not dissimilar to a use that attracted the Soviets . . . It is an ideal spot for electronic eavesdropping on communications on the American mainland. In other words -- it is a good base for spying. It is also a useful relay point for routing intelligence back home," observes Suchlicki, director of the Institute of Cuba and Cuban-American Studies at the University of Miami.

During the past two years, he continues, Cuba and China have exchanged high level military delegations, including visits by Defense Minister Raul Castro and Cuba's top generals to China, and a trip to Cuba by General Dong Liang Su, head of the Chinese Military Commission. In February, a top-level Chinese military delegation, led by Defense Minister Chi Haotian, visited Cuba. It was the first time a Chinese Defense Minister had visited Cuba. "It should be no surprise," adds Suchlicki, that China would want "an electronic espionage base close to
American shores."

For more information go to the American Foreign Policy Council.

http://www.cnsnews.com/news/article/peoples-liberation-armys-leap-forward-china-boosts-techno-spy-base-cuba#.VjyL-V9B_zk.twitter
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Re: Going Cuba
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2015, 12:50:08 PM »
REFLECTION IN THE DRAGON'S EYE: (dated 2012) CHINA, CUBA, AND THE ESPIONAGE ALLIANCE AGAINST THE U.S.

International News Analysis Today
January 5, 2012
By Toby Westerman


China's intelligence operations are the "core arena" for achieving the superpower status which the Communist elite in Beijing so passionately desires. Central to its spy activities is the island of Cuba which is strategically located for the interception of U.S. military and civilian satellite communications. China's spy services also cooperates closely with Havana's own world-class intelligence services.

Inexplicably, the U.S. mass media are ignoring both the existence of the spy base as well as the Cuban-Chinese alliance which is responsible for it.

International News Analysis Today is challenging that media silence in an exclusive interview with counterintelligence expert Chris Simmons, who explains why China needs Cuba and details the dangers to the United States in Havana's espionage partnership with Beijing.

Simmons is a retired Counterintelligence Special Agent with 28 years service in the Army, Army Reserve, and the Defense Intelligence Agency, and has testified on the subject of Cuban espionage before members of U.S. House Foreign Affairs Committee.

Simmons notes that China has the largest espionage network in the world with an estimated two million career staff intelligence officers, making Beijing's spy services larger than the intelligence operations of all the other nations in the world combined.

While Americans are well aware of China's financial might, its espionage activities get relatively little attention.

"We are too often distracted by China's economic gains. For China, however, espionage and economics are tied hand in hand, and China has the largest appetite for U.S. secrets in the world," Simmons told International News Analysis Today.

The members of China's intelligence services, both its officers and those recruited as agents by those officers, tend to be ethnic Chinese, Simmons observed. This ethnic orientation of China's espionage services limits the available avenues of access to American security information. China's spy alliance with Cuba, however, assists China in overcoming this potential handicap.

Cuban penetration of U.S. society augments Chinese efforts and makes an extremely valuable contribution to Beijing's overall espionage effort. Cuba's human intelligence operations give needed perspective to information China receives both from its own operatives and from electronic spy bases operating in Cuba.

"That is why China needs Cuba," Simmons stated.

The kind of restricted information gathered electronically in Cuba covers military, economic, and political affairs, and ranges from how foreign policy is determined to indications of troop and fleet movements to significant details on important political figures.

The value Beijing places upon the information acquired via Havana can be seen in the October 2011visit to the island by Gen Guo Boxiong, Vice Chairman of China's Central Military Commission. Guo's presence in Cuba underscored that China has a special military commitment in addition to a sizable economic investment in Cuba.

China is in the process of replacing Cuba's aging Soviet-era military equipment, purportedly supplying only "non-lethal" aid. The U.S. prohibits "lethal" assistance to Cuba, and Beijing is risking U.S. sanctions if that prohibition is known to be violated. The true volume and nature of Chinese military aid to Cuba is, of course, difficult to assess.

General Guo's trip to Cuba follows a December 2010 military agreement, signed by top ranking PLA General Fu Quanyou, insuring needed military aid to the Castro regime.

Simmons pointed out that China's electronic intelligence activities on Cuba are particularly interesting, because China claims they don't exist.

"Officially they are not there," said Simmons, commenting upon Beijing's denials that it has electronic spying capabilities in Cuba.

The island of Cuba has been used as an electronic spy base for decades, going back to the Soviet construction and use of the facility at Lourdes. The construction of the base at Lourdes was hard to miss as the concrete buildings and large antennas appeared on the Cuban landscape.

The Russians pulled out of Lourdes in 2001, much to the relief of many in Washington and the expressed displeasure of Fidel Castro and his regime. Simmons stated that Moscow scored a propaganda victory in the U.S. media and among the U.S. political establishment with its abandonment of Lourdes.

The reality of the matter, however, was much different than appearances seemed to indicate, Simmons told International News Analysis Today.

When the Russians left Cuba, they also left a well-trained Cuban electronic intelligence battalion functioning on the island at the base in Bejucal, as well as an understanding with Havana to share intelligence information important to Moscow.

As a result, Russia saved millions of dollars which had been spent on the Lourdes base, Moscow avoided Congressional censure and obtained important economic cooperation from the United States, all at the same time still receiving important intelligence information on the U.S. from Cuba.

"It was a win-win situation for the Russians," Simmons stated.

The base at Bejucal, however, is still operating. While the Cubans technically run it, some 50-100 Chinese intelligence officers are at Bejucal gathering and interpreting information, according to Simmons.

In sharp contrast to Moscow, there is no political cost to China.

"It took us years to find out they [the Communist Chinese] were operating there. We found out through émigrés, defectors, and travelers to Cuba," Simmons told INA Today.

Unlike the Soviets, China has not constructed a facility and only with the greatest of difficulty can the Chinese be connected with Cuban electronic spy base activities. In this way, China can plausibly deny both the use of the base and the transference of information from its Havana embassy to Beijing, Simmons informed INA Today.

The Chinese even took pains to cover the expected increase in radio traffic from the Chinese embassy in Havana to Beijing as the Bejucal base, and smaller bases across the island which are connected with it, became more active.

In anticipation of a greater volume of radio communication activity between Cuba and China, Beijing gradually increased useless or "dummy" radio traffic with Havana. These "dummy" messages were later replaced, at least in part, with actual intelligence information generated from the Bejucal facility and its sub-stations as they became an important Chinese information source.

As a result, the U.S. has difficulty determining the "spikes" of real intelligence information within the broadcasts of "dummy" transmissions coming from the Chinese embassy in Havana, Simmons said.

The eye of the Chinese dragon is upon the United States. We do not know what information is coming from bases that supposedly do not exist, but Simmons commented on China's military and commercial investment in Communist Cuba and declared that, "Whatever they [the Chinese] are paying, they are getting a steal."

Chris Simmons is a security consultant and is author of the soon to be released novel, The Spy's Wife.

http://www.inatoday.com/cubadragoneye132012.htm
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Offline J.C

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Re: Going Cuba
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2015, 12:52:04 PM »
June 11, 2012
Dirty Little Secret: Why China Needs Cuba

As China continues its quest to replace the U.S. as the world’s only superpower, spying remains a core means in fulfilling its economic, military, and political needs. The FBI has long considered China the greatest spy threat to the United States, based in part on the research of the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, which continues to perform an excellent job documenting the Chinese espionage threat (see http://www.uscc.gov/)
French writer Roger Faligot, author of The Chinese Secret Service from Mao to the Olympics, contends more than two million people work for Chinese intelligence. For comparison, Dennis Blair, the former Director of National Intelligence, said 200,000 personnel serve in the U.S. Intelligence Community. His figure does not include foreign agents working for the United States.

Functionally, most of China’s spies work, directly or indirectly, in espionage performed by agents and collaborators. Beijing’s second greatest espionage capability is stealing foreign communications – “Signals Intelligence” or SIGINT in spy parlance. While China maintains “the most extensive SIGINT capability of any nation” in Asia according to a U.S. government report, Beijing’s historical challenge has been the lack of direct access to satellite and radio downlinks going directly into the United States.

Normally, gaining access to downlinks is relatively easy, as the signal coming towards earth spreads out into a huge cone covering hundreds, if not thousands of miles. However, the sheer volume of U.S. communications requires a vast number of satellite dishes and antennae arrays, making such a SIGINT effort impossible to hide. As a result, China proved unable to collect against most U.S.communications until the late 1990s, when Havana provided it access to the regime’s major SIGINT sites.

Cuba’s location places it in the downlink of dozens of U.S.government and commercial signals. From an espionage standpoint, nowhere else in the Western Hemisphere provides a better site to conduct unrestricted SIGINT operations. Headquartered at Bejucal, just west of Havana, the SIGINT effort run by Cuba’s Directorate of Military Intelligence (DIM) involves roughly 1000-1,200 personnel. Defectors claim Havana also operates covert SIGINT sites in its Washington-based Interests Section and in its diplomatic facility at the United Nations. These covert sites provide unique access to localized communications. Defectors and émigrés also report for at least 20 years, the DIM has collected more SIGINT than it can analyze.

According to think tanks, Cuban émigrés, and the media, Chinese military SIGINT personnel have served at Bejucal and a sister site at Santiago de Cuba since at least 1999. There, U.S. military communications as well as financial and political information is collected and analyzed by an elite Cuban-Chinese military team. In exchange for U.S. secrets, China appears to provide Havana with weaponry, updated SIGINT equipment, intelligence training, and money.

Moscow proved the unique role Cuba can play in SIGINT targeting of the United States. For nearly 40 years, it ran a massive SIGINT complex at Lourdes, near Cuba’s Bejucal facility. However, the 28-square mile facility became a political liability and economic drain on Moscow after the Cold War. In 2001, Russia closed it and removed its 1000-1500 personnel. In contrast, China avoided risking any political and economic costs of its SIGINT endeavor by embedding its staff in Cuban facilities. This commingling has also made Beijing’s presence significantly smaller and less visible, providing China plausible deniability about its role.

https://cubaconfidential.wordpress.com/2012/06/11/dirty-little-secret-why-china-needs-cuba/
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Re: Going Cuba
« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2015, 13:02:27 PM »
Snowden got stuck in Russia after Cuba blocked entry: newspaper dated 2013

Former U.S. spy agency contractor Edward Snowden got stuck in the transit zone of a Moscow airport because Havana said it would not let him fly from Russia to Cuba, a Russian newspaper reported on Monday.

Snowden, who is wanted in the United States for leaking details of U.S. government surveillance programs, had planned to fly to Havana from Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport a day after arriving from Hong Kong on June 23....
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/08/26/us-usa-security-snowden-idUSBRE97P05M20130826#du0t964ghIFS48bJ.99


aftermath.


Everything We Know About The Huge Spy Base In Cuba That Russia Is Reopening (dated 2014)
http://www.businessinsider.com/the-spy-base-russia-may-reopen-in-lourdes-cuba-2014-7?IR=T

Russia 'agrees to reopen Cuba spy base' (dated 2014)
http://news.yahoo.com/russia-agrees-reopen-cuba-spy-110458401.html?soc_src=mediacontentstory&soc_trk=tw

John Kerry reopens embassy in Cuba, but tensions remain (2015)
http://edition.cnn.com/2015/08/14/politics/cuba-embassy-opening-john-kerry-visit/

China, Cuba Seek Economic and Defense Cooperation (2015)
http://thediplomat.com/2015/06/china-cuba-seek-economic-and-defense-cooperation/

Google and China in battle over Cuba's Internet future (2015)
http://www.cnbc.com/2015/08/12/the-challenge-of-bringing-internet-to-cuba-.html

Air China to Start Flights to Cuba in December Nov 15)
http://airwaysnews.com/blog/2015/11/05/air-china-to-start-flights-to-cuba-in-december/

*****
LOURDES THE SPY LISTENING POST IN CUBA
http://www.autentico.org/oa09478.php

Maybe you see something, something ... dark siders.
please park your car right here.
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Offline J.C

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Re: Going Cuba
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2015, 11:40:37 AM »
Spying on America: Russia to reopen Cold War-era base in Cuba

https://youtu.be/ZIi7417TEJQ

Russian spy ship docks in Cuban harbor

https://youtu.be/T2YkPWfJEYk
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Re: Going Cuba
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2015, 14:34:08 PM »
Lourdes DOD Snap



Lourdes Business Insider



Lourdes Spy Base 2006



Actual Capture Lourdes Spy Base Area (Google)



Lourdes Spy Base Admin HQ

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Re: Going Cuba
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2015, 14:37:31 PM »
Historical Dictionary of Signals Intelligence

Nigel West (Scarecrow Press, 2012), 340 pp., bibliography, index.

Reviewed by Gary K.

Nigel West is the well-known author of many books on intelligence. He has authored or coauthored nine of the 16 historical dictionaries published by the Scarecrow Press on intelligence topics and so is well-placed to attempt perhaps the most difficult of all historical intelligence dictionary subjects: the highly classified field of signals intelligence (SIGINT). West does not shrink from the challenge; he takes on not just British SIGINT, and not even just British and US SIGINT. In fact, West has attempted to corral the SIGINT activities of most of the world’s nations over the past century. No volume could manage such a difficult task well, particularly given how closely guarded the subject is—very little of what the world’s SIGINT agencies have done since WW II has been declassified.

It is obvious, but needs to be stated, that what is available in primary sources determines, and limits, what West—or anyone writing about SIGINT—is able to use. West recognizes this and says so. His bibliographic essay acknowledges the challenge: “Because of its sensitive nature, relatively little has been published about SIGINT” and “detailed SIGINT studies are rare indeed.”(275) West’s bibliography for the entire Cold War tells more of the story. It lists only about 20 sources, while he lists more than 50 for the much narrower VENONA program.

A significant and surprising gap in West’s otherwise fair-minded selection of sources is the lack of references to histories of SIGINT written by NSA historians. Given that the American SIGINT system, as closed as it may be, is probably the most open of all of those services worldwide, one would have expected a nod to them—they actually know what has happened in US SIGINT since WW II. His bibliography notes only two of NSA’s historical publications. The first is Thomas R. Johnson’s American Cryptology during the Cold War, 1945–1989. Oddly, West notes in one place that the work was “declassified,” (285) when, in fact, it was redacted, i.e., still classified materials were deleted; in an earlier reference to that volume, (163) he had it right. Much of Johnson’s history indeed remains classified. West also notes Frederick D. Parker’s monograph,A Priceless Advantage: US Navy Communications Intelligence and the Battles of Coral Sea, Midway, and the Aleutians, (288) and acknowledges William Friedman, (286) Robert Benson and Michael Warner, (290–91) Hayden Peake, (291) and many veterans of the WW II SIGINT effort. WW II, however, is not where the information gap is.

The works of these IC writers are excellent, but NSA’s Center for Cryptologic History maintains on its unclassified website][1]many additional unclassified or redacted histories—some monographs, and some shorter works that NSA calls brochures—yet West mentions none of them in his bibliographic essay or period bibliographies. If one is interested in US SIGINT history, in this reviewer’s judgment, the Center for Cryptologic History is the place to start.

Still, in providing an introductory essay, a chronology, more than 300 entries, appendices, and, importantly, a bibliography, West has made the best of a difficult subject. His dictionary samples a wide field and will be worthwhile for most scholarly and public educational uses. Also, importantly, West has maintained a sober, balanced, dispassionate—and therefore credible—tone throughout and avoided the breathless, alarmist language of many works on intelligence, especially SIGINT.

The following small sampling of West’s 300 entries illustrates his welcome tone and supplies a good sense of the work’s strengths and weaknesses. On the plus side are:
  • a nice paragraph on Abner, an early, important, computer. (9) Helpful details like this on obscure, seemingly inconsequential topics are sprinkled throughout the dictionary. They are only unimportant until one needs to know about them.
  • a perhaps too succinct but still helpful entry on the Cold War (61–62). A goodly number of other entries—e.g., on the Cuban Missile Crisis, US military SIGINT organizations, and various specific episodes—flesh out the picture, though even with those, many gaps will remain in the Cold War story for years.
  • an excellent entry on Vietnam (228–33) gives an idea of the kind of detail that could be known about SIGINT if more declassified primary records became available. Of course, volumes could be written about SIGINT (American, Vietnamese, Chinese, and Soviet) during the Vietnam War, but the level of detail West has provided in this entry indicates that in some areas primary sources are sufficient to provide firm ground for public knowledge.
Examples that illustrate the challenges caused by dearth of available source material include:
  • too brief an entry on Russia’s GRU (the military’s General Staff Main Intelligence Directorate, which conducts human and signals intelligence operations abroad) (115), which, one imagines, would warrant volumes if the information were available.
  • too brief a mention of the largest and probably most effective Soviet SIGINT site outside of the Soviet Union, in Lourdes, Cuba, which probably targeted the eastern seaboard of the United States and possibly Latin America, as well. Only noted in an entry on FAPSI (the Russian Federation’s signals collection organization), the site operated continuously for many years. Undoubtedly, West could find relatively little primary information about Lourdes, and not surprisingly, the Russians have not deigned to release any of it. In any case, Lourdes deserved its own entry, even if only a cross-reference to FAPSI.
A number of topics could have been treated more fully and some were not treated at all even though supporting information is available. For example:
  • the Black Chamber, the first US Cryptologic organization, about which much is known, receives only a seven-line entry. (36–37)
  • the United Kingdom’s SIGINT agency, the GCHQ, is covered in an overview, (109–12) which, while solid, is briefer than it could be. In addition, the bibliography fails to include Richard J. Aldrich’s significant, 665-page study, GCHQ, published in 2010, although West does list a 30-page article that Aldrich published in 2010 on the same subject.
  • Korea has no entry.
It is not hard to see how this dictionary could be expanded upon for many years to come as more information about SIGINT is released and as time allows consideration of things that might have been included in this edition but were left out. Among them might be many other known instances of SIGINT activity from WW I through WW II, including those of non-allied combatants whose efforts, beyond a few big stories, still remain relatively unknown in English. Also of value would be entries on Cold War communist SIGINT efforts against NATO and ASEAN nations. In the end, though, for all its shortcomings, this volume is nevertheless a sound first step.

https://www.cia.gov/library/center-for-the-study-of-intelligence/csi-publications/csi-studies/studies/vol-57-no-2/historical-dictionary-of-signals-intelligence.html
[PDF] https://www.cia.gov/library/center-for-the-study-of-intelligence/csi-publications/csi-studies/studies/vol-57-no-2/pdfs/GaryK-Dictionary%20of%20SIGINT.pdf
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Offline J.C

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Re: Going Cuba
« Reply #9 on: November 17, 2015, 18:59:05 PM »
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Offline J.C

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Re: Going Cuba
« Reply #10 on: December 09, 2015, 21:42:20 PM »
US watches as Cuba and Russia strengthen economic ties
http://globalriskinsights.com/2015/11/us-watches-as-cuba-and-russia-strengthen-economic-ties/

U.S., Cuba begin talks on billions in claims       
http://on.wsj.com/1lMvRDd

Russia's Direct Fund Interested in Cuba Deals as Economy Expands
http://bloom.bg/1OH6JJF

cars....
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Offline J.C

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Re: Going Cuba
« Reply #11 on: October 23, 2016, 12:32:08 PM »
Hello cuba we told ya!
took awhile this news was coming up. sharing with you.

With a permanent airbase in Syria now, Russia looks at renewing Soviet-era bases in Cuba and Vietnam

Russia considers opening military base in Cuba
BY FRANCO ORDOÑEZ
[email protected]
  • WASHINGTON Russia is looking to expand its military presence and has its eye on Cuba and other Latin American countries.
Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu said Russia has come up with a list of countries where it’s considering opening military bases. They include Cuba, Nicaragua, Venezuela and Vietnam, according to Russia’s state-owned RIA Novosti news agency.


Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega and first lady Rosario Murillo (center and right) walk with Russia's President Vladimir Putin (left) upon his arrival at the international airport in Managua, Nicaragua on July 11, 2014. Cesar Perez AP

“The talks are under way,” Shoigu told reporters in Moscow.

Russia has made several inroads in Cuba, including in nuclear energy, train repair and air traffic control technology. Cuban President Raul Castro visited Moscow last year to attend the 70th anniversary celebration of the defeat of the Nazis in World War II and the Red Army's key role in the defeat.

Cuban state media has cited the Russian military overtures, but the Castro administration has not offered any public indication of whether they’re welcomed. Gregory Weeks, the editor of the academic journal The Latin Americanist, doubts Cuba would allow the Russian government to open a military base on the island as it could be seen as a threat to the United States at a time when the island nation is seeking better relations with its larger northern neighbor.

THE TALKS ARE UNDERWAY.Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu

“I don’t see any chance of that happening,” said Gregory Weeks, the chairman of the department of political science and public administration at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. “I don’t think Cuba want this. Cuba just spent years trying to improve relations with the U.S.. If they allow Russia to open a military base, all that would blow up.”

Russia pulled out of Cuba and Vietnam in the early 2000s as part of efforts to lower its military presence and improve ties with the United States. They included closing it Lourdes signals intelligence base in Cuba and the Cam Rahn naval base in Vietnam, which the country is considering reopening.
Russia has made inroads in Nicaragua, which has raised concerns in Washington. It was one of several reasons cited by members of Congress who voted to restrict Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega government’s access to loans from international financial institutions unless it accepts international observers and takes other steps to promote democracy.

I DON’T SEE ANY CHANCE OF THAT HAPPENING.Gregory Weeks, editor of The Latin Americanist

In August, Russia sold or gave Nicaragua 50 Russian tanks, received access to Nicaragua’s airspace and ports and got approval to build a law enforcement center near the Pacific coast.

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/article107473897.html#storylink=cpy
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Offline J.C

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Re: Going Cuba
« Reply #12 on: August 09, 2017, 20:26:40 PM »
big "Hmmmm" here. this sounds not good.


U.S. Diplomats in Cuba Reported Experiencing ‘Physical Symptoms’ Following ‘Incidents’

FBI investigating the matter

Some United States government personnel on official duty in Havana, Cuba have reported feeling a variety of "physical symptoms" following "incidents," according to a State Department spokesperson.

There are concerns about the safety of these diplomats, and the FBI is currently investigating the matter, CBS Radio News reports. The U.S. responded by asking two Cuban officials in the U.S. to leave the country on May 23.

The State Department has so far not specified what these "incidents" were and what "symptoms" the diplomats were experiencing.

The State Department spokesperson said the U.S. has reminded the Cuban government of its obligation to protect diplomats under the Vienna Convention, CBS correspondent Steve Dorsey reported.

http://freebeacon.com/national-security/u-s-diplomats-cuba-experiencing-physical-symptoms/
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