Author Topic: ENGADGET: NSA wants encryption that fends off quantum computing hacks  (Read 1845 times)

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Offline UltraTime

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http://www.engadget.com/2015/08/30/nsa-quantum-resistant-encryption/

NSA wants encryption that fends off quantum computing hacks


by Jon Fingas |                                | 9 hours ago



The National Security Agency isn't just yearning for quantum computers that can break tough encryption -- it wants encryption that can protect against quantum computers, too. Officials have begun planning a transition to "quantum resistant" encryption that can't be cracked as quickly as conventional algorithms. As the NSA explains, even a seemingly exotic technique like elliptic curve cryptography "is not the long term solution"
people thought it was. Quantum computing is advancing quickly enough that the NSA and other organizations could find themselves extremely vulnerable if they're not completely ready when the technology becomes a practical reality.

This doesn't mean that the NSA is asking the government or security vendors to avoid upgrading their 'traditional' encryption. It already has suggestions for cryptographic methods that should make it easier to adopt quantum-proof security. However, the agency doesn't want others pouring a lot of their time and money into encryption that may well become obsolete in the "not too distant future." Even though you aren't likely to see a wave of quantum hacking any time soon, the prospect is real enough that the NSA is treating it as a high priority.
GOD FORBID THE LIGHTS GO OUT and a zillion brains have to be retrained to function in manual reality.

Offline QxStart

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Re: ENGADGET: NSA wants encryption that fends off quantum computing hacks
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2015, 22:46:42 PM »
Caution before assuming that Signal does not have abackdoor in place.

 
If you have not you should look at the law put in place in1994 called CALEA -Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act - This is what regulates the telecommunications industry with regards to providing back doors.  Under CALEA any company that's part of the industry including hardware manufacturers as well as carriers have to provide a back door.  Any company that is a substantial replacement for a telecommunications company has to provide a back door a well and they define a "substantial replacement" by the following:  If you can dial a phone number, then that's a substantial replacement, so being that you can call a phone number from a Skype account they have to provide a back door.
 
EdwardSnowden should know this and pushing people to Signal is not responsible if in fact they can use your existing phone book and you can dial numbers.



I’m busypromoting a product that has received a 19 page opinion letter on the subject. In this day and age if Apple and Google both US companies are allowing a product that would clearly violate CALEA, you have to ask yourself are they not really violating the law? And is Signal CALEA compliant? Here is a link to CALEA


 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communications_Assistance_for_Law_Enforcement_Act

Offline UltraTime

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Re: ENGADGET: NSA wants encryption that fends off quantum computing hacks
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2015, 05:17:14 AM »
Good info! Thanks! =)
GOD FORBID THE LIGHTS GO OUT and a zillion brains have to be retrained to function in manual reality.