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1
Introductions / Hello
« Last post by Vlad on Today at 16:26:43 »
Hi,

I have a website which may be of interest and I would welcome constructive criticism

www.gchq.ga

The domain name for the British signals intelligence agency GCHQ just happened to be lying around so I took it.

Thanks
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Belarus / Re: Belarus Activists Arrested Before Planned Protest
« Last post by J.C on March 25, 2017, 16:03:27 PM »
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Belarus / Belarus Activists Arrested Before Planned Protest
« Last post by J.C on March 25, 2017, 15:39:23 PM »
REPORT:

Riot police in the Belarusian capital have raided the office of a human-rights group hours ahead of an attempt by opposition activists to mount a large protest march.

Authorities banned the demonstration planned for Saturday afternoon and dozens of police detention trucks were deployed in the center of Minsk.


The authoritarian former Soviet republic has seen an unusually persistent wave of protests over the past two months against President Alexander Lukashenko, who has ruled since 1994. After tolerating the initial protests, authorities cracked down. Lukashenko this week alleged that a "fifth column" of foreign-supported agitators was trying to bring him down.

About midday Saturday, police raided the office of the Vesna human rights group. About 30 people were detained, said Oleg Gulak of the Belarusian Helsinki Committee, another rights organization.

http://www.voa.com.np/2017/03/blog-post_8819.html

MORE:

Video from today:
https://twitter.com/JNiemelainen/status/845640727686205440

BELARUS | More and more people being detained during protests in central #Minsk on Freedom Day.
https://twitter.com/thevocaleurope/status/845643277252661250





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Russia / Five months, eight prominent Russians dead
« Last post by J.C on March 25, 2017, 13:05:17 PM »
just wondering where all the leaks are from Assange about this killings. oh wait! pretty sure that´s not in VAULT7 where paranoid wikileaks followers will find their faces on a Samsung TV :-) *snapshot*

Five months, eight prominent Russians dead


Washington (CNN)The brazen daytime slaying of a Russian politician outside a Ukrainian hotel this week brings to eight the number of high-profile Russians who have died over the past five months since the US presidential election on November 8.

Among the recent deaths were five Russian diplomats. Some of the deaths appeared natural and governments have ruled out foul play.
In some cases, though, questions remain. That's either because the facts have changed over time, details are hard to come by, or the deaths are still under investigation.
Self-proclaimed online sleuths and conspiracy theorists have filled the information void with speculation that the deaths were somehow related to Russia's interference in the 2016 presidential election. No evidence has surfaced to make such a connection.
Here's a rundown of the eight deaths—and one near fatality:

Russian politician who fled to Ukaine shot dead

Denis Voronenkov, 45, was gunned down Thursday outside a hotel in Kiev. Voronenkov and his wife both spoke out against Putin after they left Russia for Ukraine in October.
Voronenkov also helped Ukraine in its ongoing fight against Russian influence, testifying in a treason trial against ex-Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych, who was perceived as a puppet politician for Russian President Vladimir Putin.
Ukraine's president called the shooting a "Russian state terrorist act." Russian authorities denied the accusation.

Russian ambassador to the UN suddenly dies

Vitaly Churkin, 64, Russia's ambassador to the United Nations, died on February 20 of an apparent heart attack. He was "in his office fulfilling his duties" when he died, according to a statement from the Russian mission at the UN.

Russian ambassador to India dies after brief illness

Alexander Kadakin, 67, the Russian ambassador to India, died on January 26.
A spokeswoman for the Russian embassy in New Delhi said that Kadakin died after a short illness and that there was nothing "special or extraordinary" about the circumstances that led to his death.
Kadakin had worked in India since 2009. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi described him as "a great friend of India" who worked hard to strengthen relations between the two countries.

Russian diplomat found dead in Athens

Andrey Malanin, a senior diplomat at the Russian embassy in Greece, was found dead in early January.
Malanin, 54, was the head of the Russian embassy's consular section in Athens. Police sources told CNN that worried colleagues called authorities after Malanin didn't show up to work for a few days. Police entered his apartment on January 9th and found him dead on his bedroom floor.
Initial reports from Greek police suggested Malanin died suddenly from natural causes. Two Greek police officials said foul play was not suspected. An investigation remains underway.

Former intelligence official found dead in his car

Oleg Erovinkin, who had close ties to Russian intelligence, was found dead on December 26 sitting in his car on the streets of Moscow. Russian news outlets reported that he was 61 years old. Russian government agencies have not released an official cause of death.
He was a former general in the Russian law enforcement and intelligence agency known as the FSB. He also served as chief-of-staff to Igor Sechin, the president of state-owned oil giant Rosneft. Sechin enjoys a close relationship with Putin that dates back to the 1990s.
Because of Erovinkin's background, conspiracy theorists and Russia watchers have speculated that he might have been a source of information in the 35-page dossier that detailed alleged links between the Trump campaign and Russia. No evidence has emerged to firmly substantiate those claims.

Diplomat fatally shot in back

Russian ambassador to Turkey, Andrey Karlov, 62, was assassinated in Ankara on December 20. He was shot at point-blank range by a gunman while speaking at an art exhibition. The shooter, who was a Turkish police officer, shouted "do not forget Syria" during the assassination.

Russian diplomat shot to death in Moscow

The same day as Karlov's killing, Petr Polshikov, 56, a senior Russian diplomat, was shot to death in his Moscow home, according to Moscow newspaper Moskovskij Komsomolets. The paper said Polshikov's wife found him in their bedroom with a pillow over his head. Underneath the pillow, police found Polshikov with a head wound.
A spokesman from the Russian Foreign Ministry said Polshikov's death was likely an accident and had nothing to do with his official government duties, according to Russian news outlet REN-TV.

Russian official in NYC dies on Election Day

On the morning of the U.S. election, November 8, about an hour after the first polls opened in New York City, police received a 911 call about an unconscious man inside the Russian consulate. When they arrived, they found Sergei Krivov, 63, unresponsive. Emergency responders declared him dead at the scene.
Krivov, who was born in Russia, had served in the consulate as duty commander involved with security affairs, according to Russian news reports.
Russian consular officials first said Krivov fell from the roof. Then, they said he died of a heart attack.
The initial police report filed on the day of the incident said Krivov was found "with an unknown trauma to the head," according to a New York Police Department spokesman.
However, after conducting an autopsy and finishing its investigation, the New York City Medical Examiner ruled that Krivov died from bleeding in the chest area, likely due to a tumor. Police sources said foul play wasn't suspected and that Krivov had been in poor health.

Russian lawyer for whistleblower is nearly killed

Earlier this week, a private Russian lawyer on an anti-corruption crusade reportedly fell from the fourth floor of his Moscow apartment.
Nikolai Gorokhov, 53, was near death with "severe head injuries" and remains in a hospital's intensive care unit, according to his friend, investor Bill Browder.
Gorokhov represented Sergei Magnitsky, a fellow Russian lawyer who exposed Russia's largest ever tax fraud -- and was later jailed and beaten to death in a Moscow detention center. Gorokhov continued his client's fight.

http://edition.cnn.com/2017/03/24/europe/dead-russians/index.html

SEE MORE:

"Heart" Attacks

The Dead Russians = (if you´re not a Leaker and Windows Sharepoint Admin wannabe spy like Snowden with some secret NSA stuff, you´re a dead whistleblower in Russia :-) without all that caviar and Vodka for sure.
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sounds very interesting. readers of the Forum can easily
connect the dots.

Wikileaks Hands “Keys” to Putin’s Russian Hacker – Readers, Leakers Tracked

Exclusive analysis by Laurelai Bailey, published by Patribotics this week confirmed that Julian Assange and Wikileaks obtained two new servers in Russia just one week before the hacked Podesta emails were released.

Laurelai reported that the ultimate registrant of the servers was one Peter Chayanov, of Russia, a known cyber-criminal and hacker.
Julian Assange has been identified by the US intelligence community as a front for Russian distribution and ‘deniability’ of Russian government-sponsored hacking. Today, however, as a result of our reporting on the dox by Op Ferguson, that link is far clearer.

The internet is tightly controlled in Russia. Cyber criminals have to answer to Putin. Mr. Chayanov is the head of a firm called Hostkey, which hosts mail spammers and other malware and hacking tools, despite offering web space to Wikileaks. Wikileaks chose to use a Russian hacker to host their site – and they knew that he was connected to Vladimir Putin and operated with the blessing of Putin’s government.

Putin and Assange are thus already linked.

But it is much worse for Wikileaks – and the internet in general – even than it looks. In order not to bury the lede, I will report what appear to be the conclusions of the web developers and hackers on Twitter discussing Laurelai’s story, and then report on how they appeared to have arrived there.

* Wikileaks has handed Chayanov access to everything stored on its site and servers

* The Russian hacker and spammer can ‘monitor traffic

* He can tell who is reading anything on the Wikileaks site anywhere in the world

* The Russian hacker has access to all documents that have been sent to Wikileaks

* He can probably bust the anonymity of any computer or user who thought they were anonymously donating to Wikileaks

* It is not reasonable to suggest that this hacker is other than linked with Russia’s GRU – if he has it, they have it

* Through Julian Assange and his website, it appears that the Russian hacker and his government can track any readers of the Wikileaks site and any donors of material to it, thus allowing Russia to ‘blackmail’ anyone who ‘sent secrets’ to Wikileaks as a ‘whistleblower’.


I will update this story later in the day summarizing discussions among the hacker and developer community on Twitter that led to this bombshell conclusion.

All of the above appear to be factual statements. It is not a fact that Russia did indeed monitor web traffic to Wikileaks, but it seems to be an absolute fact that if they want to, they can – and it seems, from the reaction of Mr. Chayanov upon being outed, almost totally certain that Julian Assange handed Russia the keys to the Wikileaks site deliberately.

When Julian Assange wrote “Wikileak the Government” he apparently meant “Wikileaks is the Government (of Russia)”.
A subsequent post will explore the further possibility that Peter Chayanov is also Guccifer2 – providing the materials that hacked the US election, as well as helping Assange and Wikileaks work with Putin to do so.

https://patribotics.wordpress.com/2017/03/14/wikileaks-hands-keys-to-putins-russian-hacker-readers-leakers-tracked/amp/
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WikiLeaks related News / Re: WikiLeaks CIA cache: Fool me once
« Last post by J.C on March 12, 2017, 19:21:47 PM »
"Assange was promising that WikiLeaks was going to work with tech companies to correct the vulnerabilities of products to the big evil CIA."

Assange couldn´t work a normal 40hrs standard week in a office. he thinks he still is an expert on the matter of everything connected to IT topics from 4.0 to Vulnerabilities.
There are Kids out there 45yrs younger than Assange with much better skills.

this guy is outdated and with all that cyber espionage stuff going on. cyber will suffer a lot in the future.

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WikiLeaks related News / Re: WikiLeaks CIA cache: Fool me once
« Last post by Jerbar on March 11, 2017, 13:40:57 PM »


   I have to say this latest fiasco by Assange was more affirmation of the severity of his decline. I read a large thread of comments following the NYT post on how Assange was promising that WikiLeaks was going to work with tech companies to correct the vulnerabilities of products to the big evil CIA.

   The great majority of all the comments were along the lines of "No way would I let that Kremlin pawn near my phone!".... "I don't want Putin in my phone!" .... "Isn't that like letting the fox guard the hen house?"... on and on that way.

   Yet Assange seems oblivious to all of this. It is as if he is completely unaware of his total lack of credibility among the general public these days.

   There are a few, very few Assange fanatics that still completely worship the conman. This new bone that he has thrown them is the kind of stuff that keeps them clinging to whatever fantasy world he has created for them. I think Assange blocks out all bits of reality to create his self delusion and remain a legend in his own mind.

   Assange has absolutely no interest in the privacy of others. He will very willingly expose very private information of anyone that gets in the way of his political agenda. He has absolutely no interest in transparency, he is only releasing damaging material on western democracies selectively, allowing corrupt regimes a free pass on all of their dirty little secrets.

   Ecuador is about a month out from holding its presidential elections. In the running is at least one or two candidates that have vowed to get Assange out of their embassy in London if they win. Things could get interesting if Assange losses his little hiding place. 

   
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WikiLeaks related News / WikiLeaks CIA cache: Fool me once
« Last post by J.C on March 11, 2017, 12:02:35 PM »
WikiLeaks CIA cache: Fool me once




This week's poorly conceived distraction from Trump and Putin sittin' in a tree was brought to us by WikiLeaks, which dumped 8,761 documents of the CIA's hacking arsenal online for all to see. The leak factory didn't even bother trying to play coy -- it actually made the "Vault 7" password an anti-CIA JFK quote about destroying the agency.

Hilarity ensued. Well, if you think it's funny when the press parrots WikiLeaks' misleading claims wrapped in PR spin.

What sort of misleading claims? How about the suggestion that the safest encryption apps, Signal and WhatsApp (neither of which actually appear in the document dump), are broken. Or that the CIA bugs everyone's phones. That our government is spying on us through our TVs with the flick of a switch. And that the CIA, which is providing evidence to Congress in the Trump-Russia probe, is part of a conspiracy to damage ... Russia.

When the news hit Tuesday morning, the bigger outlets ran wild, uncritically repeating the WikiLeaks press statement, and reporting on the documents without having them verified. If only being first was better than being correct.

WikiLeaks framed the whole media-attention sideshow as a giant embarrassment for an out-of-control CIA. Breitbart loved it. Especially the bit about how the CIA is trying to frame those completely innocent Russian government hackers. Hey, at least it was a break from WikiLeaks lending support to Trump's ravings that Obama wiretapped him.

By Tuesday afternoon, people were starting to get over the shock of learning that the CIA is a spy agency. A few news outlets started to correct their shit. They might've even felt a bit swindled by having regurgitated that crucial first round of PR from WikiLeaks, casting the dump as some sort of Snowden 2.0. (Snowden, for his part, has done his very best to make it a Snowden 2.0.)

Many in hacking and security weren't taking the bait to begin with. Many hackers were less interested this time by what was in the drop than by who it was from, and why it was being released now.

By now the press has started to sort things out -- but only after the misinformation had spread. But as Zeynep Tufekci writes, this is just a page from the WikiLeaks playbook. This time, she said, "there are widespread claims on social media that these leaked documents show that it was the C.I.A. that hacked the Democratic National Committee, and that it framed Russia for the hack. (The documents in the cache reveal nothing of the sort.)"

In an unusual turn, the CIA made a statement. Intelligence officials told press the agency was aware of a breach leading to this very dump, and is looking at contractors as the likeliest source. A formal criminal probe has been opened.

Thanks to the disinformation, lots of people are concerned about what was in the dump and how it affects their privacy and security. The contents haven't been confirmed by the CIA but it looks like it's shaping up to be the real deal. It mostly contains a lot of attack tools, and lots of clues that CIA operatives love Dr. Who, Nyan Cat, and hoard cheesy memes.

The files consist mostly of notes and documentation on the CIA's hack attack tools -- very specific tools used when the agency focuses on a very specific target. These aren't just hoovering up everyone's data like the lazy old NSA -- this is what a modern Bond's "Q" would use to go after a special someone, or someones.

As in, probably not you.

The attacks focus on operating systems, not on apps themselves. That bit you read about the CIA cracking Signal and WhatsApp was false. What this all shows, interestingly, is that encryption on those apps is tight enough that even the CIA hasn't been able to break them and needs to pop old versions of iOS just to read some ambassador's uncreative sexts.

There is literally no surprise here. The ubiquity of large systems having exploitable bugs, and the implications of this, have been reported on for decades.

Perhaps the nonstop cycle of social-media outrage has given us collective amnesia. What's old is new, and suddenly everyone is shocked to hear that there are 0-days in Windows and Android, and people are taking advantage of exploits. We all jump on a chair and lift our skirts and cry "rat!" because someone, somewhere, hasn't taken our advice about what to do with vulnerabilities.

So what's vulnerable, according to the CIA's hack attack tools circa 2013-2016? That would be Windows (Exchange 7 and 10 especially), OS X El Capitan, some Apple iPhone operating systems, and as we'd expect, a range of Android system exploits. The documents indicate that antivirus products like F-Secure, Bitdefender and Comodo are a pain in the ass to deal with, which makes them look pretty good.

The irony is that the best way to avoid these kinds of attacks is to update your system software when you're supposed to, don't get phished and try not to become a CIA target by, say, committing treason. Oh, and don't stop using reputable encrypted apps. Especially not because some guy with a hard-on for the CIA told the press the apps were compromised.

The docs do reveal that the CIA is well into hacking Internet of Things devices to use for surveillance with its Embedded Development Branch. According to journalists who are actually reading the documents, meeting notes from 2014 show that the CIA's analysts "are looking at self-driving cars, customized consumer hardware, Linux-based embedded systems and whatever else they can get their hands on."

This is to be expected, because spies gotta spy. Of course, because we live in a time when companies are using connected teddy bears to surveil kids and then getting owned by malicious hackers, we should expect spy agencies to roll IoT into their bespoke little government-funded "Q" laboratories.

It should make you uncomfortable -- and angry -- as hell that the CIA can use your smart toaster to spy on you. But, what's really troubling is that it's just piggybacking on data that companies are already collecting. Truth is, the US government isn't the early adopter here; Amazon, Google and Facebook are really the front-line developers of the surveillance state.

https://www.engadget.com/2017/03/10/wikileaks-cia-cache-fool-me-once/

cc:



https://www.engadget.com/2017/03/10/wikileaks-cia-cache-fool-me-once/
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"Kremlin Pawns being Kremlin Pawns all day loong" is the quote here.

Leaked emails reveal Nigel Farage's long-standing links to Julian Assange

  • Emails leaked to Business Insider show long-standing links between Nigel Farage and WikiLeaks' Julian Assange.
  • Farage visited the Ecuadorean Embassy on Thursday but declined to say whether he had met Assange, who lives in exile there.
  • UKIP has campaigned in the European Parliament on behalf of Assange.

LONDON — There was much confusion Thursday when Nigel Farage was spotted by BuzzFeed leaving the Ecuadorian Embassy in London — the residence of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.

Asked why he was there, Farage replied that he couldn't remember what he was doing in the building, adding, "I never discuss where I go or who I see."

Emails leaked to Business Insider, however, reveal that UKIP under Farage's leadership had long-standing links to Assange.

In February 2011, after a European Arrest Warrant had been issued in a case in which prosecutors sought to question Assange in connection with a sexual-assault allegation, UKIP repeatedly reached out to Assange to see how they could work together. Assange has not been charged in the case.

The office of UKIP MEP Gerard Batten contacted Assange's lawyer Mark Stephens about "the possibility of meeting Mr Julian Assange."

They added: "So far, UKIP London has been only British political party to openly support Mr Assange fight against EAW and his freedom of speech, and we would very much like to continue doing so."



Leaked minutes of a subsequent meeting between Batten and Stephens reveal that Batten promised to table a motion in support of the WikiLeaks founder in the European Parliament. The party also offered the opportunity of a joint video press conference in Brussels.



The Farage-led Europe of Freedom and Democracy group subsequently tabled a motion attacking "the possible abuse of the European Arrest Warrant for political purposes."

Sitting alongside Farage, Batten called for the Parliament to debate Assange's arrest warrant.

https://youtu.be/gQrSYiVo460

"Is the Assange case about the alleged crimes committed or is it about the desire of America to extradite him from a compliant European country?" Batten asked MEPs.

When the European Parliament denied the chance for a debate on Assange, Batten later called them "contemptible."

In an appearance on the Russian state broadcaster Russia Today, Batten also labelled the attempts to extradite Assange as a "legalised kidnap."

https://youtu.be/IwCQF9zABdE

A month later, the party organised a House of Lords event on the European Arrest Warrant with Assange's lawyer as the star guest.



The Trump connection

Farage has also advocated on behalf of Assange since WikiLeaks' involvement in the US presidential election.

Speaking on his LBC radio show in January, Farage repeated Assange's denial of Russian involvement in the hacking of the Democratic National Committee and Democratic presidential nominee Hilary Clinton during the election.

"Julian Assange ... is absolutely clear that all the information he has got is not from Russian sources," Farage said.

The question of Farage's trip to meet Assange was raised at a White House press conference on Thursday.

The White House press secretary, Sean Spicer, was asked whether Farage had visited Assange "on behalf" of Trump. Spicer did not answer the question, saying only that "I don't keep [Farage's] schedule. I generally don't worry about what's going on across the pond."

Watch Trump's spokesman questioned about Farage and Assange.

https://youtu.be/wCQMg2_O9v8

A representative for Farage was contacted for comment.

http://www.businessinsider.de/leaked-emails-nigel-farage-wikileaks-julian-assange-2017-3?r=UK&IR=T
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