Author Topic: Manning statement: 'I don't consider myself anti-war or a conscientious objector  (Read 2895 times)

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enrica

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Bradley Manning statement: 'I don't consider myself anti-war or a conscientious objector'

US soldier convicted over WikiLeaks disclosures says she did not leak the documents because she was explicitly motivated by pacifism




Text: Bradley E. Manning

89289

1300 North Warehouse Road

Fort Leavenworth, Kansas 66027-2304

2013.10.07
Statement for Public Release

Subject: Concerns Regarding 2013 Sean lVlacBride Peace Award

Uinfortunately, l'm very concerned about a substantial disconnect I discovered between
whatil've experienced in the last few weeks, and what's occurred in the rest of the world
since my arrival at the U.S. Disciplinary Barracks in August. Unfortunately, |'ve been largely
left (fut of the loop on the details about what's been occurring over the last several weeks.
This partly due to my limited contact with the outside world during the phase
of arrival, but it's also because We been trying to decompress and focus on other things
afteria and exhausting court--martial process.

The most obvious disconnect I discovered has to do with the "2013 Sean McBride Peace
Awar,5d" that was supposedly accepted on my behalf by Ms. Ann Wright (a retired Colonel in
the 0.8. Army). I say supposedly had absolutely no idea I received this award, let
alone accepted it. in fact, I first found out about the award when began receiving mail
containing quotes from Ms. Wrights acceptance speech.

Now, please don't get me absolutely flattered and honored to receive this
awarid (or any award, for the matter), but I was shocked and frustrated about what's
occufirred here: that it seems that We been left out of the process. And, to make matters
worse, now there exists the possibility that there might be more false impressions out there
in regards to how i feel about the award, how it ties to my actions in 2010, and who I am.

Eor example, Ms. Wright states that "[w]hen was told by [my] lawyer [Mr. David
Coofinbs] that ll-"B [International Peace Bureau] had selected [me] as the recipient of this
yearis award, was overwhelmed that such an organization would recognize [my] actions
as actions for peace."1 There are a few issues with this sentence:

 The conversations We had with Mr. Coornbs have been somewhat brief and heavily
focused on the common legal and logistical minutia that needs to be worked out after a
large court-martial. There's little room in our scheduled time (set by the U.S. Disciplinary
Barracks) for discussion of anything not focused on the authentication of court--rnartial

documents and transcripts or my ongoing request for a Gender treatment plan
that ifollows recognized medical standards?

1 Chelsea ivlanning given 2013 Sean lvlacliiride Peace Award," by Ann Wright, Private Manning Support
Network, 2013.09.19.

9 Sea Worid Professional Association for Transgender Health, "Standards of Care," Seventh Version,
201130925.
Subject: Concerns Regarding 2013 Sean MacBride Peace Award

 From my perspective at least, it's not terribly clear to me that my actions were
explicitly done for "peace." don't consider myself a "pacifist," "antiwar," or (especially) a
"conscientious objector." accept that there may be "peaceful" or "anti-war"
implications to my this is purely based on your subjective interpretation of the
primary source documents released in 2010-2011. I believe that it is also perfectly
reasonable to subjectively interpret these documents and come to the opposite opinion and
say "hey, look at these documents, they clearlyjustify this war" (or diplomatic discussion, or
detention of an individual). This is precisely the reason why avoided overbroad and
unnecessary redactions on my end while providing (and attempting to provide) these
docuinents to media organizations in early 2010. l'm a "transparency advocate." feel that
the public cannot decide what actions and policies are or are notjustified if they don't even
know; the most rudimentary details about them and their effects.

 the next sentence, Ms. Wright says that know the history of the MacBride Award."3
As embarrassed as I am to admit this--~l don't. in fact, i only learned of its existence in the
last few days. I certainly know who Sean MacBride is, and what Amnesty International is. i
even ivagtiely know what the IPB I had no idea of the award's existence.

lsimply don't know what's happened here. I absolutely don't believe there is a
conspiracy, or any bad intentions on anyone's part. But, whatever has happened, i don't
believe it's productive. And, I believe it would be totally dishonest ifl don't make the public
aware of this disconnection. So, to avoid any disconnection or miscomrnunication in the
future, all of my "official" statements and position coming from me shall be in the form of a
signed letter or release, similar to this one, with my letterhead and date at the top of the first
page, and my signature at the bottom of the last page. Statements or positions filtered
through my attorney or other representative should be considered unofficial, unless they
deal with purely legal issues and positions, or they are accompanied by a signed "official"
letteri or release.

 lastly, l'd like to clarify that, as far as l'm concerned, I no longer have any rank.
While i still have a pay grade of E--1 (with total forfeitures of pay), I do not have an associated
rank gwhile in confinement. I prefer to use or no title, instead of using
"Pvtfi or other military titles. And, l'd like to thank everyone who has avoided misgendering
me and switched to using my new name and feminine pronouns.

Thank you,

Q.

CHELSEA E. MANMNG

3 Chelsea Manning given 2013 Sean lviacBride Peace Award," by Ann Wright, Private Manning Support
2013.09.19.

    • Editor's note: Bradley Manning's lawyer David Coombs later posted an entry on his blog in response to Manning’s Guardian statement. The lawyer said that he had spoken to Manning and reminded her that he had told her about the Sean MacBride peace award on three occasions. According to the post, Manning told Coombs that she did remember the discussions but that she had been “feeling isolated and out of touch with the outside world... which had led to her confusion over this issue.”
    [/list]

    Source: http://www.theguardian.com/world/interactive/2013/oct/09/Bradley-manning-statement-full-document
    « Last Edit: October 15, 2013, 13:04:38 PM by isis »

    enrica

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    Chelsea Manning rejects 'pacifist' label in first statement since sentencing
     
    Exclusive: In first public remarks since guilty verdict, WikiLeaks source expresses intense upset at public presentation of her

    Read Chelsea Manning's full statement
     
     

    'It’s not terribly clear to me that my actions were explicitly done for peace'. Photograph: Patrick Semansky/AP

     
    Chelsea Manning, the WikiLeaks source formerly known as Bradley Manning, has expressed intense unhappiness at the public profile that is being presented about her, warning that a false impression is being given to the outside world that she is an anti-war pacifist and conscientious objector.
    In a statement issued to the Guardian, Manning insists that she did not leak hundreds of thousands of US classified documents to WikiLeaks because she was explicitly motivated by pacifism. Rather, she sees herself as a “transparency advocate” who is convinced that the American people needs to be better informed.
    “It’s not terribly clear to me that my actions were explicitly done for ‘peace’... I feel that the public cannot decide what actions and policies are or are not justified if they don’t even know the most rudimentary details about them and their effects.”
    In her first public comments since she was sentenced in August to 35 years in military custody for leaking the largest quantity of US state secrets in history, Manning writes that she is increasingly concerned about what she calls a “substantial disconnect” between her experiences at the US military prison at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, where she is being held, and messages that are being put out to the rest of the world without her knowledge or approval. “I was shocked and frustrated about what’s occurred here,” she writes.
    Manning’s concerns relate to the 2013 Sean MacBride peace award which was granted to the former army private last month by the International Peace Bureau in recognition of her “outstanding work for peace” in “revealing information about US war crimes”. The award was accepted on Manning’s behalf by Ann Wright, a retired US army colonel who is a prominent peace activist and opponent of the Iraq war.
    In that speech, Wright suggested that Manning was “overwhelmed” that the Sean MacBride award had recognized “her actions as actions for peace.” Yet the former soldier insists that she has never perceived her actions in transmitting more than 700,000 classified US classified documents to WikiLeaks in 2010-11 as an act for peace.
    “I don’t consider myself a ‘pacifist,’ ‘anti-war,’ or (especially) a ‘conscientious objector’,” she writes. “Now – I accept that there may be ‘peaceful’ or ‘anti-war’ implications to my actions – but this is purely based on your [Wright’s] subjective interpretation of the primary source documents released in 2010-11.”
      Chelsea Manning. Photograph: AFP/Getty Images 
    Manning goes on to state that the material contained in the WikiLeaks trove could be used to support the opposite conclusions. “I believe it is also perfectly reasonable to subjectively interpret these documents and come to the opposite opinion and say ‘hey, look at these documents, they clearly justify this war’ (or diplomatic discussion, or detention of an individual).”
    Manning is expected to spend at least eight years in military prison for her role as the source of the WikiLeaks disclosures. She writes that since the end of the trial in August she has been “trying to decompress and focus on other things after a lengthy and exhausting court-martial process”.
    Those other interests includes her request to have treatment for gender dysphoria, which she announced through her lawyer David Coombs at the end of the trial.
    Wright, speaking from South Korea where she is on a speaking tour, said she was distressed that Manning felt her beliefs had been inaccurately portrayed in the acceptance speech. “My intention was to reflect in an appropriate way Chelsea’s views drawn from her statement to court and her previous comments. I deeply apologise to her.”
    In her statement, Manning said she was not aware of having received the award. However later on Wednesday, her lawyer, David Coombs, said that he reminded Manning in a phone call that they had discussed the issue on three occasions.
    Coombs wrote in his post:
    [quote( author=(.*) link=(.*) date=[0-9]+)?]After being reminded of these conversations, Chelsea indicated that she did, in fact, remember the award and our discussions about it. She told me that she got confused when she recently received mail about the award, and assumed that people were writing to her about a new award. 
    Chelsea told me that she has been feeling isolated and out of touch with the outside world during the indoctrination period at the United States Disciplinary Barracks, which is what led to her confusion over this issue. Due to this confusion, Chelsea said she felt the need to write her letter. She told me that she is sorry if her letter caused any offense to the International Peace Bureau, Col. Wright, or her supporters.[/quote]
    Manning opens her statement using the name Bradley Manning – a legal requirement insisted upon by the military prison hierarchy. She ends it with the sign-off Chelsea Manning, and thanks “everyone who has avoided misgendering me and switched to using my new name and feminine pronouns”.
    She also makes clear that in the light of her sentence she no longer expects to be referred to by military rank such as Spc, Pfc, or Pvt. Instead, she asks to be called “Ms” or with no honorific at all.

    Source: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/oct/09/chelsea-manning-not-a-pacifist