Author Topic: Insurance a big problem for mentally ill  (Read 1358 times)

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Insurance a big problem for mentally ill
« on: April 03, 2014, 17:23:53 PM »
Insurance a big problem for mentally ill

 03. apr. 2014 13.09 English


 
 
Current and past sufferers of mental illness can find it extremely difficult getting insurance.
 
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The websites of insurance companies are full of good arguments for purchasing their products, but obtaining a policy is no easy matter for current or past sufferers of mental illness.

A survey conducted by the campaign ONE OF US for weekly radio programme P1 Dokumentar has found that one in five of 801 current or past sufferers of mental illness has been turned down by an insurance company.

In more than eight out of ten of these cases, mental illness was cited as the reason for the rejection.

No normal life
The problem is a familiar one for organisations such as the Danish Association for Mental Health (SIND), which advocates understanding and tolerance of people with mental problems and illnesses and their families, and Better Psychiatry, which supports the relatives of sufferers of mental illness.

Both organisations believe the reluctance of insurance companies to issue policies to current or past sufferers of mental illness is having serious consequences.

“If you are unable to get insurance in a society like the Danish one, you can’t live a normal life in the same way as everyone else. It can be difficult, for example, to start a family if you’re unable to obtain life insurance that will provide for your family if you die,” said Knud Kristensen, chairman of SIND.

Knock-on effect
Better Psychiatry finds that the biggest problem for current or past sufferers of mental illness is getting health or life insurance.

This can have a knock-on effect given that banks may require their customers to have life insurance before they will offer a mortgage.

“This means that current or past sufferers of mental illness may have to turn to costly quick loans, which everyone is warned against,” said Ebbe Henningsen, chairman of Better Psychiatry.


 “No problem”
The Danish Insurance Association declined to speak to DR News, but did send this written response:

“The Danish Insurance Association is not of the impression that mentally ill people generally have a problem getting insurance. We are in ongoing dialogue with SIND, which has informed us, among other things, that it wishes to help its members make contact with other insurance companies if they are unable to get insurance with a particular company. We are obviously continuing this dialogue with SIND and are happy to look at whether we can work together to identify and resolve any problems.”

http://www.dr.dk/Nyheder/Andre_sprog/English/2014/04/03/130838.htm