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Offline mayya

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Russian Media Takes Aim at Turkey
« on: November 30, 2015, 23:51:10 PM »
Russian Media Takes Aim at Turkey

Since shootdown of Russian warplane, state-dominated networks have lambast country near the Syrian border, painting the Black Sea nation as a hotbed of terrorism and a sponsor of Islamic State.

 
A member of the Communist Party of Russia held a portrait of Turkey's president Recep Tayyip Erdogan during a protest on Friday outside the Turkish Consulate in St. Petersburg. PHOTO: TASS/ZUMA PRESS

By
PAUL SONNE
Nov. 30, 2015 4:41 p.m. 
 

MOSCOW—Russian media have a new enemy No. 1: Turkey. State-dominated networks have been lambasting the country in the days since the Turkish air force shot down a Russian warplane near the Syrian border, painting the Black Sea nation as a hotbed of terrorism and a sponsor of Islamic State.
The coverage marks a dramatic shift in tone from Russian reportage before the incident. For years, Turkey has mostly figured in Russian public consciousness as a discount beach destination, a source of vegetables and clothing and a reliable partner in construction projects, including Sochi’s prized Olympic venues.

But last week’s incident landed Turkey on Russia’s growing list of geopolitical enemies, putting the nation in the cross hairs of a state media apparatus that has become increasingly quick and aggressive in turning the public against the Kremlin’s foes.

The rise of Turkey as a new enemy has partially rekindled the wartime mind-set that emerged on Russian television during the Ukrainian conflict in 2014, when it helped propel President Vladimir Putin’s ratings to record highs.
[quote( author=(.*) link=(.*) date=[0-9]+)?]‘A country that is an abettor of terrorism and at the same time a member of NATO discredits the entire alliance.’

—Russian talk-show host Vladimir Solovyov on state channel Rossiya 1[/quote]
“We’ve now been given another enemy that’s surrounding us,” saidAndrei Kolesnikov, senior associate at the Moscow Carnegie Center, a nongovernmental think tank. “The besieged fortress will only become stronger as a result, try to defend itself more vigorously, rally around its leader more actively and hate all of the rest of the world even more.”

Russian state television has become particularly adept at branding the Kremlin’s enemies with emotive labels in recent years. It has portrayed Ukrainians as fascists, Europeans as liberal, gay-accepting heathens and Americans as the world’s malicious puppetmasters, pulling strings around the globe to undermine and destroy Russian interests.

The new line of attack against Turkey: The country is a nation of traitorous terrorism supporters.

“Through this incident, Turkey has raised a very difficult question for NATO: Can Turkey be a member of NATO when the country is a sponsor of terrorism?” popular Russian talk-show host Vladimir Solovyov said Nov. 25—a day after the shootdown—on state channel Rossiya 1. “A country that is an abettor of terrorism and at the same time a member of NATO discredits the entire alliance.”

‘It is not possible for us to accept an allegation suggesting Turkey is buying oil from Daesh. We are not so dishonorable that we would enter into such transactions with terrorist organizations.’
—Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan




Dmitry Kiselyov, a Russian anchor on Rossiya 1 who has suggested that gay organ donors’ hearts be incinerated and touted Russia’s ability to turn the U.S. into radioactive ash, devoted practically all of his weekly news feature show “Vesti Nedeli” on Sunday to the newfound conflict with Turkey. His message: Turkey isn’t what you think it is.

A series of reports on the show painted Turkey under President Recep Tayyip Erdogan as a country that backs Islamic State, openly allows public calls to jihad, exports damaged and possibly carcinogenic produce to Russia and has purposely unleashed a wave of refugees into Europe as a “special operation.”
One segment said Mr. Erdogan’s son Bilal was profiting from a shadow oil business that funds Islamic State. Another said the Turkish president was backing the Grey Wolves, a Turkish ultranationalist organization, in his fight against the Kurds and Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad.

“It’s difficult for all the members of NATO to discern the motives of Erdogan, a demonstrative character who we now understand is deceitful,” Mr. Kiselyov said during the broadcast. “He not only has become addicted to cheap oil from terrorists, he is dreaming of resurrecting the great Ottoman Empire and hand-feeding the fascist Grey Wolves organization.”

In Paris on Monday, Mr. Erdogan fired back in particular at the Russian assertion that Turkey is in the oil business with Islamic State. “It is not possible for us to accept an allegation suggesting Turkey is buying oil from Daesh,” he said, referring to the group by its Arabic acronym. “We are not so dishonorable that we would enter into such transactions with terrorist organizations.”

Meanwhile, on Russian TV, Mr. Kiselyov also slammed Turkey for not apologizing for the shootdown. He pointed out that after an anti-Russian mob murdered the Russian ambassador in Tehran in 1829, the Shah of Persia sent the giant Shah Diamond to Russia as compensation. People may not send diamonds these days, but apologizing is still customary, Mr. Kiselyov asserted.

 Turkey for Russians is no longer what it was before. There are things more important than beaches, sun and all-inclusives.’
—Russian TV anchor Dmitry Kiselyov


He further accused Mr. Erdogan of having designs on Crimea, the Black Sea peninsula that Russia annexed from neighboring Ukraine last year, where the largely pro-Ukrainian Crimean Tatars have retained close links to Turkey since the days of the Ottoman Empire.

“For Erdogan, Crimea is a sweet dream—the cherry on top of a big cake of a new Ottoman Empire,” Mr. Kiselyov said.

Throughout the past week, Russian state media have accused Mr. Erdogan of cracking down on journalists and opposition figures, enriching his inner circle, funding far-right groups to fight against a neighboring country and attempting to revive a lost empire—the same accusations critics leveled at Mr. Putin during the conflict in Ukraine last year.

“We live in a time when the space for irony is dwindling,” said Gleb Pavlovsky, a political consultant and former Kremlin adviser.
“In the Western press, it was well known that Erdogan was described as the Turkish Putin,” Mr. Pavlovsky said. “But in Russia, Erdogan always emerged as a positive example. Even Putin said he was practically an ally.”

The feeling of having been betrayed is what has made Russia’s turn against 
Turkey particularly vitriolic, Mr. Pavlovsky said. State television commentators regularly repeat Mr. Putin’s accusation that Turkey has stabbed Russia in the back.

Everyday Russian viewers have received a clear message that Turkey is now verboten.
“Turkey for Russians is no longer what it was before,” Mr. Kiselyov said in Sunday’s broadcast. “There are things more important than beaches, sun and all-inclusives. It is now truly dangerous.”

—Emre Peker in Istanbul contributed to this article.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/russian-media-takes-aim-at-turkey-1448919682?mod=e2fb