Author Topic: Facebook rebellion in Croatia - The Mediterranean domino effect?  (Read 13606 times)

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potjeha

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It looks like the revolutionary spark has also affected Croatia, a country that corrupt politicians and predatory capitalism have morally and economically completely destroyed. Probably encouraged by the protests in the countries of North Africa, several young people decided a few weeks ago to set up a facebook group called "The big protest to topple the government”. They demand the resignation of the government and new early elections.

Since late February they’ve been organizing almost each day anti-government protests in all major croatian cities. In the start there were only small rallies in front of the government in the capital city Zagreb, but after a few days they grew in a massive protest of over 10.000 people.

The protests were predominantly peaceful except a few like the one that took place on Saturday 26th February. This one was  mostly attended by war veterans who called on the Croatian government to protect them from extradition and it turned violent when a group of younger anti-government protesters clashed with the police.





Since last week the protestors have also support from left politicians.Today have gathered again thousands of protesters in Zagreb led by the textile factory workers who haven’t recieved their salaries since several months.

Actress and director Senka Bulić also joined today’s protest and she said something that describes quite accurately the kind of these demonstrations: “This is probably the most unorganized protest ever and anywhere, but it is unified. So many young people are angry, resigned, disappointed by the government that should take care of them, but doesn’t do it. I had to give them support, that’s the reason I’m here.”

http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/News/Canada%20-%20World/Society/2011-03-06/article-2306152/Croatia-antigovernment-demonstration-attracts-thousands/1
« Last Edit: March 09, 2011, 00:52:19 AM by potjeha »

Offline lizrex

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Re: Facebook rebellion in Croatia - The Mediterranean domino effect?
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2011, 00:14:18 AM »
Thank you for a great post, very well written.  I wish the best to Croatia.

Offline TinfoilBuddha

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Re: Facebook rebellion in Croatia - The Mediterranean domino effect?
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2011, 16:21:51 PM »
Josipovic should make sure they hold a referendum on the possible EU membership.
Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too.  ~Voltaire

greekemmy

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Re: Facebook rebellion in Croatia - The Mediterranean domino effect?
« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2011, 14:22:33 PM »
When I was growing up in Greece in the 70's and 80's we heard nothing about Croatia, they simply "did not belong to the West" although we felt there was a distiction between  Tito's Yugoslavia and the rest of the "Eastern Block". It is as if they seized to exist for a few decades and they popped out again in our consciousness in the 90's through their declaration of independance and the war that ensued. The Greeks being Christian Orthodox rather than Catholic in general side with the Serbs on an emotional level but they saw the breakup of Yugoslavia and the war that followed as something inevitable and justifiable since national self-determination is something very close to the Greek's heart. The expression of conflict at national, international and social level is also very much part of the Balkan character. To conclude, as a Balkan nation, I expect the Croatians to be in the streets protesting about political issues, the same as the Greeks do all the time. In 2009/2010 many kept asking me in the UK about the "troubles" in Greece, riots demonstrations, etc. The deaths were regrettable in any circumstances but the fact is that public protests, political rallies, anti-govenment demonstrations, country crippling strikes (the unions are still strong) are part and parcel of the democratic movement in Greece and I would in fact worry if they stopped happening. Political/social apathy was viewed as something of an illness when I was growing up. Of course one should point out that such vibrancy of political expression against well in effect state institutions as well as the government (left or right wing) is an indication that political institutions are ineffectual in expressing discontent and bringing about social change.   Ultimately though if  any nation values client relationships higher than the rule of law (in the widest possible meaning, the one where law represents justice) then political dissent might find itself in a forever repeating spiral as well as very short lived in negotiating social change.  Will the Balkans follow on from the Middle East, well I say the Balkans are always bubbling away I just hope the lid is kept off at all times.


Offline TinfoilBuddha

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Re: Facebook rebellion in Croatia - The Mediterranean domino effect?
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2011, 13:01:22 PM »
A quite interesting article.  I am surprised it didn't happen much much earlier, the cup of tears is full, now it is overflowing and enough is enough. Everybody except a very few are suffering from this extreme government corruption and all that has been achieved is the complete exploitation of croatian natural resources...and next point on the agenda is to give up national souvereignty - the very thing Croatia fought for not so long ago. Redicilous! Where is the benefit for Croatia joining the E.U.? The Belgians don't even have a functioning government, it's a country that is literally falling apart, yet they are supposed to be a rolemodel for Croatia and they shall accept the E.U. as their new overlords in return for NOTHING? It is bad enough already that Croatia joined NATO..also, what for? To have foreign soldiers stationed in their territory? To be sent to Afghanistan and Iraq? And what's next? to fight alongside dubious paramilitary groups of Libya? What is really going on there is far from clear and it is not like Egypt at all.

As a economical union the E.U. made some sense a few years back...but as a political superstructure it is totally unecceptable (after the lisbon treaty). ..nothing but delegate bureaucrats pushing through some non-sensical anti-democratic aganda with a pseudo parliament (for cosmetics). Thank god their whole construct is in such dire turmoil and that they keep postponing Croatia's 'annexion'...this gives Croats the time to really re-evaluate if there really is even a need for them to be joined into this 'european titanic agenda'..if Brusselles say "drown" maybe we let Brusselles have seniority rights, they can have    antecedence.

In my own opinion, the E.U. 'as is' does not serve the best interests of Europeans, and those people who developed it into what it is  today do not seem to understand anything about Europe, maybe they come from planet mars..it must be the bodysnatchers run amok.

Stop the sellout of croatia  >:(

STOP THE SALES OF CROATIAN FORESTS AND WATERS
SPRIJEČIMO PRODAJU HRVATSKIH ŠUMA I VODA
http://www.causes.com/causes/570325
« Last Edit: March 11, 2011, 13:11:38 PM by Kerstin »
Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too.  ~Voltaire

Voda

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Re: Facebook rebellion in Croatia - The Mediterranean domino effect?
« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2011, 23:28:34 PM »
protest in Zagreb, Croatian capital


potjeha

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Re: Facebook rebellion in Croatia - The Mediterranean domino effect?
« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2011, 00:32:18 AM »
Josipovic should make sure they hold a referendum on the possible EU membership.

The referendum must be held because the Croatian Constitution requires it. The government and the opposition are just arguing now whether it should be held before or after the parliamentary elections. If they continue like that, it can easily happen that only the referendum take place. ;D

potjeha

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Re: Facebook rebellion in Croatia - The Mediterranean domino effect?
« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2011, 00:50:42 AM »
@ greekemmy

Yes, it seems that Croatia follows the Greek example, and not only regarding the state debt.  ;)

Although I share your opinion that the expression of conflict at national, international and social level is very much a part of the Balkan character, I was quite surprised by this social rebellion in Croatia because it seemed that the entire nation was in a kind of a deep stupor. For many years after the independence war in Croatia dominated an overly patriotic atmosphere in which there was no room for any criticism. The hypocrites of all kinds took advantage of this situation and in 20 years they had stolen and sold everything of value. Some recources they even gave for free like a part of the sea only to join the EU. Those who dared even to think to criticize negative phenomena in society were immediately labeled as  communists and “yugonostalgics”, often by the Church which began to intervene in almost all matters after forcing the opinion that being Croatian automatically means also being religious or more precisely a Catholic. Instead of making progress Croatia went back in time, apathetic and listless. Until the protest wave from north Africa swept the country and woke people from their sleep. However, Croatian demonstrators who still have in their minds ravages of war and bloodshed have chosen a different way of protesting. They decided for peaceful demonstrations, but on a daily basis. They believe that they can oust the odious government through persistance. And they require also direct democracy because they lerned that there is actually no essential difference between the single and multi-party system because both of them allow the creation of a ruling elite. In their processions can be found rightists as well as leftists, students, fishermen, workers, war veterans, etc. In short, the entire spectrum of society is represented.

Since Croatia is a small country, I think that there is under certain circumstances some probability of accomplishing the idea of a more direct form of democracy.

@ Kerstin

Though I deplore his calls for the assassination of Assange, Jeffrey T. Kuhner gave recently in his column a quite accurate description of the situation in Croatia. He mentioned some issues you've already pointed out in your comment. Here is the link to the article:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2011/mar/10/arab-revolts-spread-to-europe/?page=2
« Last Edit: March 15, 2011, 20:11:04 PM by runa »

Voda

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Re: Facebook rebellion in Croatia - The Mediterranean domino effect?
« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2011, 10:02:00 AM »
protests are organised every second day. people are walking through the streets with drums and whistles, making noise and request for early elections. few days ago they visited Japan embassy to show respect with a minute of silence for all victims of earthquake in Japan.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OS6-YMzPWsE&feature=player_embedded#at=11

Offline Kaldy

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Re: Facebook rebellion in Croatia - The Mediterranean domino effect?
« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2011, 12:09:07 PM »
protest in Zagreb, Croatian capital



yesssss walk like an Egyptian , let the freedom domain , let the dignity fly high , let the power be  the people from the people to the people ............ HUMAN BEINGS WERE BORN FREE AND WILL LIVE FREE WILL DIE FREE

God be with you people of Croatia , and the whole Meditterranean and the whle world , believe in your selves to be free

greekemmy

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Re: Facebook rebellion in Croatia - The Mediterranean domino effect?
« Reply #11 on: April 05, 2011, 23:04:09 PM »
86 year old Greek composer, and a life long political activist and intelectual of the left Mikis Theodorakis is asking today the Greek people to start a political revolution, peaceful but decisive to restore constitutional public governance.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikis_Theodorakis

He says that heroic acts are being performed by small people not by heroes. It is the circumstances that a nation faces that make these small people perform heroic acts. Let's see if he shames the nation into action and what action that may be.



Offline Kaldy

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Re: Facebook rebellion in Croatia - The Mediterranean domino effect?
« Reply #12 on: April 05, 2011, 23:55:00 PM »

He says that heroic acts are being performed by small people not by heroes. It is the circumstances that a nation faces that make these small people perform heroic acts. Let's see if he shames the nation into action and what action that may be.



and he is bloody right , every spirit is stronger than 100000000000 heroes

 fight for your freedom , you can do it

greekemmy

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Re: Facebook rebellion in Croatia - The Mediterranean domino effect?
« Reply #13 on: May 27, 2011, 19:21:27 PM »
For several days now Greek citizens have been gathering in squares in Athens and other cities to protest yet again against the economic situation. There are always protests in Athens the big difference now is that these protests are not organized by political parties or trade unions that are usually controlled by political parties.

I would be nice to hear a first hand account of the events.

http://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/

Offline Quantum

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Re: Facebook rebellion in Croatia - The Mediterranean domino effect?
« Reply #14 on: May 27, 2011, 19:42:52 PM »
All Balkan countries need a good reshuffle of their entire political cabinet....they need to especially get rid of the old ones, those who during the "transition" period struck backroom deals and are now in a whirlwind of self-interest and corruption. You can't cut them off corruption. But you can cut them off of our tax money.
However the death toll of these "revolutions" worry me a great deal and refrain me from being very positive about them.
You must satisfy your invariant instincts or you will be at odds with your own character. It is only when we are not at odds with our basic makeup that we can find life meaningful. - Julian Assange