Author Topic: EU data storage directive! and Norway  (Read 6147 times)

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Offline DigitalViking

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EU data storage directive! and Norway
« on: March 15, 2011, 00:26:13 AM »
Now there is Norway's turn protesting against EU data storage directive!

There are big disagreement about the impact and role  of Norway, if either Norway agree or refuse the  EU directive. The political intelligent people of Norway are united, and don't want the directive, but the politicians suffer of pressure and consequences of choice.
http://www.eu-norway.org/

http://stoppdld.no/(norwegian site protesting against the directive)

Please feel free to discuss. -.-

Offline Erxaz

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Re: EU data storage directive! and Norway
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2011, 15:02:25 PM »
What's the consequences that they might meet if they don't agree? Norway is a free country, and just because it's based in Europe doesn't mean it have to follow the union like everyone else, in my opinion.

Offline wlforumid

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Re: EU data storage directive! and Norway
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2011, 16:59:32 PM »
Sweden falls in line with controversial EU data retention rules, 12.11.2010:
http://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,,6223369,00.html

"The Swedish government presented a draft legislation Thursday that requires telephone and Internet providers to retain all customer communication data for six months...The bill was based on a European Union directive ordering member states to store telephone, e-mail and Internet usage data, as well as the location of mobile phones for at least six months."

Just found out about this..
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Directive_2006/24/EC
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telecommunications_data_retention

As for consequences that they might be met if Norway doesn't agree, mightn't be any pressure and consequences of choice as a result - remembering that they were one of only few, decreasing number of EU countries not to go down this path; EU directives don't apply, so might see the retaining of the current policies there. As for Sweden, whether this will be legislated soon, that remains to be seen.

Offline Erxaz

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Re: EU data storage directive! and Norway
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2011, 21:40:36 PM »
Sweden falls in line with controversial EU data retention rules, 12.11.2010:
http://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,,6223369,00.html

"The Swedish government presented a draft legislation Thursday that requires telephone and Internet providers to retain all customer communication data for six months...The bill was based on a European Union directive ordering member states to store telephone, e-mail and Internet usage data, as well as the location of mobile phones for at least six months."

Just found out about this..
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Directive_2006/24/EC
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telecommunications_data_retention

As for consequences that they might be met if Norway doesn't agree, mightn't be any pressure and consequences of choice as a result - remembering that they were one of only few, decreasing number of EU countries not to go down this path; EU directives don't apply, so might see the retaining of the current policies there. As for Sweden, whether this will be legislated soon, that remains to be seen.
To the Swedish part: There's a law that's going to get added, or have been added in Sweden which will make it almost impossible to leave the union since it's going to be one of the basic laws. This means that Sweden falls directly under the command of EU. Sometimes it's good, sometimes it's bad. In this case, it's bad. Having the feeling of someone listening to your phone calls, reading you SMS and emails is not going to be fun. Feels like a dictatorship that wants to keep an eye on everything that happens in the country.

Offline wlforumid

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Re: EU data storage directive! and Norway
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2011, 00:43:49 AM »
Quote
To the Swedish part: There's a law that's going to get added, or have been added in Sweden which will make it almost impossible to leave the union since it's going to be one of the basic laws. This means that Sweden falls directly under the command of EU. Sometimes it's good, sometimes it's bad. In this case, it's bad. Having the feeling of someone listening to your phone calls, reading you SMS and emails is not going to be fun. Feels like a dictatorship that wants to keep an eye on everything that happens in the country.

You didnt clarify what law you're referring in terms of withdrawing from the EU - not aware of this, and not even sure there is one. Anyway, as for law which would mean it would be almost impossible to relinquish EU membership - couldn't any do it, isn't it so that given enough support and significant impetuses?..its not unforeseeable and its not impossible for any to leave, even if they make it one of the basic laws, laws such as these are malleable and are expressed as that in the agreement, not binding, apparently.

Hard to say whether its for better or worse off on some things, in terms of this, whether it would be of any significant benefit is arguable. As for what it actually leads to - they might catch a few bad guys, but as a necessary step, its hard to say whether this is or it is not. Actually, it wont be so effective afterall in the goal of it, as there are already known ways to cover your tracks, this is the kind of measure, and there are already many including this one already in place, which wouldnt necessarily mean greater benefits overall.

Arguably, a non-issue that they intend to keep track of things people within the EU do online, and would that kind of transparency be a good thing is arguable too..The broader implications of it, could make a situation in which any individual would maybe be careful not to deviate. Its not a ostensibly bad measure in terms particular things - in this context, seems to be for terrorism and social deviants, those are purported potential targets..rather that that actually occurring much, or at all, people would just be paranoid enough to stop whatever they consider or would be clear as what behaviour leads to tracing. Wont be occuring that listening to your phone calls, reading your SMS and emails, at least not much presumably, but its still possible and this makes it possible to retrieve. As for keeping an eye on everything that happens in the country..it is a step in that direction. What the consequences of this are and why its imposed as a measure on people is a number of reasons, but it does essentially mean youve got to watch yourself, censorship makes anything done that is not widely accepted capable of being traced, also self censorship presumably would occur, with the knowledge of these measures that are enacted on anyone deemed worthy.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2011, 20:23:36 PM by wlforumid »